How many elk are in Michigan?

They’re one of Michigan’s best kept secrets and they roam in an area most people can go and see every day! Pure Michigan’s wild elk herd is flourishing, with over 1,000 elk living in an 105,000-acre area in the northeast Lower Peninsula.

How many moose are in Michigan?

Michigan has two moose herds in the Upper Peninsula. The population in the western U.P. was airlifted from Canada in the 1980s and is growing steadily at a rate of about 2% annually, according the Michigan Department of Natural Resources. The most recent biennial survey conducted in early 2019 counted 509 moose.

How many elk permits are in Michigan?

The number of elk licenses available each year (260) is very small compared to the number of license applicants (over 44,000).

How many elk are in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan?

The latest estimates put the Clam Lake elk herd at over 250 animals, with about 80 more in the Black River herd. Elk are known to have a large range and, like deer and other animals, likely move back and forth across the Michigan-Wisconsin border. Michigan’s native elk disappeared from the state around 1875.

Why are there no moose in Michigan?

Moose are native to Michigan but had all but disappeared from the state by the 20th century because of habitat loss, hunting, wolf attacks and brainworm — a disease carried by deer that doesn’t harm them but is fatal for moose.

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What are the odds of getting an elk tag in Michigan?

2021 Elk Drawing Summary

Chances Any-Elk License Eligible Applicants Any-Elk Licenses Awarded
1 7,150 3
2 4,652 5
3 3,370 1
4 2,816 3

How far south do elk live in Michigan?

Bull elk wanders through central Michigan, 100 miles south of normal range. A Michigan elk found in its normal home range. Michigan’s wild elk population is usually found in the northeast Lower Peninsula. ISABELLA COUNTY, MI — It’s not often that you see a wild elk in Michigan much south of the 45th parallel.

Are there elk and moose in Michigan?

Moose are a native species to Michigan, but their numbers declined substantially during European settlement. By the late 1800s, moose had disappeared from the Lower Peninsula and only a handful remained in the Upper Peninsula.

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